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dispensable nation: american foreign policy in retreat." >> it's very clear to people in the region that we do not want to lead in this region. we are not engaged with the arab spring, whether it's egypt, whether it's syria, whether it's yemen, libya, we want to do less we want to reduce this region's importance in global politics. the president even compared syria to the congo saying, you know, it's just as important or not important and the conflicts in congo. and the message that comes across very clearly is that we don't want to be indispensable in region, and by implication also maybe more broadly. and the region is beginning to look at us as dispensable. >> rose: jason chaffetz, margaret brennan and vali nasr when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with libya. this week the white house clashed with house republicans over the september 11 2012 u.s. con sol attack in benghazi. in testimony on capitol hill on wednesday, consulate officials questioned the government's handling of the raid
asking you, i'm does she have to appear a notch or so to the right of obama on foreign policy? to the right? clearly to the right? >> it's almost moot because she, with in the white house. is hereign policy foreign policy. >> looking back on that tape, first of all, my glasses are much nicer now. show: we can do a whole but go ahead. >> looking back on it, it's clear and what joe says is inht, the kids on the ground iowa were the metaphor for what wanted at that time and hillary was in the position of insider establishment candidate at a time after george w. bush had kind of image of the establishment of any kind and obama the inside edge. chris: let's go forward. around hillary's in a different position. now experience counts for more. chris: because? >> certainly for the nomination? chris: because obama seems like he didn't have enough? yes, but also, they made a decision at that point that a the people in hillary land really regret. they went with experience rather than the notion of change. hey, he isn't the only change candidate, i'm a woman, and she did that. this time,
of the book, the dispensable nation, which i have here. american foreign policy retreat. he is briefed presidents, congress, many influential and not so intelligent people. he was born in tehran in 1960, and his family came to the united states having left tehran after the revolution. he has a bachelor's from masters , and earned his phd. well done. i won't go through your long list of accomplishments. there are special. but i would especially draw attention to a great part of your book which is the time you spent working under richard holbrooke in 20005-11 as part of the special office, special adviser on pakistan and afghanistan. special advisor to the secretary of state. there are always other offices one discovers that do the same thing you do, and that is part of the problem as you liotta your book which i found fascinating. other share how complex within islam will shape the future, forces of fortune, the rise of the new middle-class and what it will mean for our world. and in the you foretells certain great events that become the rise of sectarianism, although i did not always a
is the best way to invest right now? the foreign policy expert who says we need to fix what is broken at home first, and why the biggest threat to america is within our borders. it's not what you might think. >>> plus, mario batali's secret sauce. the celebrity chef's expanding empire, and his recipe for success. "on the money" begins right now. >> this is america's number one financial news program, "on the money." now maria bartiromo. >> here is a look at what is making news as we head into a new week "on the money." it is the stock market rally that just won't quit. for the first time ever on tuesday, the dow jones industrial average closed above 15,000 and then continued up again into more record territory on wednesday. both days setting all-time highs. the s&p 500 also hit an all-time high on tuesday, closing above 1600. it climbed again on wednesday. the markets took a breather on thursday, but rebounded on friday. we're at the tail end of earnings season. disney and news corp. has better than expected as did media company am c/net works. another sign in the housing comeback, foreclosur
book, foreign policy begins at home. the case, we're putting america's house in order. richard, good to see you. >> thanks for having me, maria. >> it's an intriguing title and you say the biggest threat is not from abroad but within our own home. what do you mean by that? >> two things. first of all, there's nothing abroad that's anything on the scale, say, of nazi germany or the soviet union. we face challenges abroad but nothing is existential. secondly, if we put our house in order, growing at our rate, twice our current rate, deal with long-term entitlement challenges, fix schools, infrastructure and everything else holding us back, we'll have the resources and the capacity, not just to be competitive, but to dough vote the resources, say, to military and foreign policy to discourage a competitor from emerging or if one does emerge, we can take care of it. >> the issue is we're always talking that money is tight. we have infrastructure needs in this country. needs in terms of investing in education. investing in the country. and yet, we keep hitting a wall because of the entitle
independence and constitutionalism. his thinking on immigration, foreign policy, government unions and eecllliberal education warrant considerable attention by politicians today. deeply religious man, he did not think the republic was possible without moral and religious education. and the truth will set you free ought to be the guiding principle in all of our education system as well as our republic. america he argued was trying to buy a religious man, the finest schools succeed because they shave souls as well as opinions. great presidents our product of their education. coolidge knew the value of education because his political thought was shaved act and her swear under the tutelage of its most famous professor a professor of philosophy, coolidge learned everything he need to know about politics. william james called him the greatest teacher in the united states and coolidge absolutely loved him. pages of his very slim autobiography to that old professor and after each died coolidge's wife recounted his works that on his nightstand table throughout his presidency and along with
-ton foreign policy elephant. because they're not the ones who caused the war. the cause was, the war was the decision of the civilian in the pentagon, in the white house and some in the state department. and the way that the war played out that in the end the military became the save or your. and general petraeus ended up being the hero of the iraq war with the surge. the surge ended up being the military's solution to a catastrophe caused by civilians. and the military also, as the expression goes, drank its own kool-aid too much on iraq. so it came out thinking that it deserves all the resources it can get, it has the solution to the problem, it really doesn't need civilians, it definitely doesn't need diplomats, and it doesn't needy proposal si. and it thought that it has reinvented the ending of the war. so, you know, in world war world war ii you go to vietnam, you go to balkans, you go to varieties of wars around the world. you know, the war fighters fight the or wars, the diplomats end up negotiating the end. and when you look at the balkans or in vietnam, you know, kissinger,
and erratic foreign policy, fox national security experts k.t. mcfarland and john bolton with mcfarland and john bolton with us next. [ lorenzo ] i'm lorenzo. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service® works for thousands of home businesses. because at usps.com® you can pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. i can even drop off free boxes. i wear a lot of hats. well, technically i wear one. the u.s. postal service®, no business too small. in >>. >> lou: joining me now, former pentagon official, fox news analyst. k.t. mcfarland, fox news contributor john bolton. k.t., let me start with you. the fact that we know now there are four whistleblowers that shall attacking as we specifically the position by the administration that there was no option to bring military force to bear. your thoughts? >> i understand that they want to cover up for it but if will is blood on somebody's hands? if they had an option to send someone during that eight hour period and they made the decision in advance, don'
on foreign policy, they are two possible answers to your question. the first is that for a lot of students, i think that they're very mature in the reflections on u.s. foreign policy. the ones i encountered in my courses and the ones, maybe it is self-selecting sample, going to come to classes with me, the ones i encountered when i give lectures all over the country are very unaware of some of the flaws of our foreign policy, or at least they're open to thinking about our foreign policy. i find that is a lot less true in -- i think this is the capital of that unreality, frankly. the people who may be attracted to universities in the d.c. area are people who want to work within the beltway and who have to adapt themselves to some extent the views which are not entirely in my view in accordance with reality about a variety of things. at the middle east is at the top of that unreality list so that maybe the reason. i do know. i find american academia has changed on some of these issues for the better. >> my name is bruce and i was the diplomatic correspondent for "newsweek" throughout the whole
straight. we appreciate it. >> the red linen syria and erratic foreign policy, fox national surity experts k.t. mcfarland and john bolton with us next. [ man ] on december 17, 1903, the wright brothers became the first in flight. [ goodall ] i think the most amazing thing is how like us these chimpanzees are. [ laughing ] [ woman ] can you hear me? and you hear your voice? oh, it's exciting! [ man ] touchdown confirmed. we're safe on mars. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ hi. [ baby fussing ] ♪ in >>. >> lou: joining me now, former pentagon official, fox news analyst. k.t. mcfarland, fox news contributor john bolton. k.t., let me start with you. the fact that we know now there are four whistleblowers that shall attacking as we specifically the position by the administration that there was no option to bring military force to bear. your thoughts? >> i understand that they want to cover up for it but if will is blood on somebody's hands? if they had an option to send someone during that eight hour period and they made the decision in advance, don't bother us, that is blood on their hands. >> i'
, presidents can either make their big stamp on foreign policy or domestic policy or do a little bit of both. on foreign policy, he's in a lot of trouble, too. one of the outstanding takeaways from that press conference was really his miserable handling of the syria situation. he doesn't have a lot of mojo from foreign policy. on domestic policy, you're right. the only thing that could be done subpoena something really he's attempting not to wade through because he'll ruin it. what's his legacy? is reminds me a little bit of bush 43 in that right after the ele, when the after social security and lost. and it kind of dulled his momentum. this president, i wonder if he had not gone after gun control, which probably wasn't get bable in the first place, if he had gone right into entitlement reform, corporate tax reform, right into immigration reform, whether he would have been building more momentum. and now i think he's stuck in a lot of these areas. >> senator bayh, what does this president need to do to turn things around? >> it's difficult, chris. the nation's capital and our country's polit
2006. tonight we will take up president obama's foreign policy failures throughout the broadcast. we began with syria. white house press secretary jay carney earlier today rejecting a united nations report that concludes the chemical weapons are being used by the syrian rebels, not the regime which president obama had declared to have crossed the so-called red line. >> we are highly skeptical of suggestions that the opposition could have or did use cut weapons. we find it highly likely that any type of chemical weapon used that has taken place in syria was done by the regime, and that remains our position. lou: whether skeptical or not, here is the just one week ago announcing that the obama administration was then confident that chemical weapons had been used. and he neglected to mention the white house itself had called for the united nations to investigate those reports. the president by that time was trying to walk back is redline rhetoric while acknowledging we simply don't know what is happening with serious chemical weapons. >> we have established with varying degrees of confi
on immigration, civil rights, foreign policy, government union, and especially liberal education warrant considerable attention by politicians today. this is, i believe, was he was a religious man. he didn't think a republic was possible without moral and religious education. and he believed that holy command you should know the truth and set you free. ought to be the guiding principle in all of our educational system as well as our republic. america, he argued, was founded by religious man. it's finest schools succeeded because they shape souls as well as opinions. and as we know, great presidents are products are of the education. he knew well the value of education because the political thought was shaped. .. >> the ambassador to mexico and secretary of commerce and attorney-general and supreme court justice don't never philosophically and perhaps physically far from his professors flexors -- lectures he never forgot them. he believes that would refresh the sole to bring just reward from the here and now. we looked upon gorman as a man who walked with god and his course was a demonstr
.s. government leverage its technology to foreign policy. i just found it interesting that the obama campaign hired 380 analyst to look at who is a messenger, what is the policy, what platform. and if you look at the state department and the national security council, i think there is zero or a handful of the analysts. so does it look like our ambassadors are like campaign managers for the deaths were saying, this is the policy, this is the messenger, this is the platform that we should use. so, could you go beyond social media and soda share your thoughts on how to leverage data to form foreign policy? >> the current problem is still -- the good news is the foreign policy apparatus gets the boards of technology. the problem is, we still view in foreign policy technology to the lens of public diplomacy in communicating, and i am not discounting the importance of public diplomacy and communicating, but that is just one instrument of statecraft. the bigger sort of role that technology can play is in how it empowers local entities and individuals to address local challenges. there is a huge role
, republican governor-elect christie who was able to navigate but more importantly on a foreign policy position to take the full use of the party, articulate them and translate them into the policy while is very, very smart and reflective of what the people want. however you have a competing interest that's grown in the two years between -- since 2011 that pushed back against that because it's now become intertwined with a social agenda, and it's kind of lost some of the economic edge with the success of obamacare and other successes the administration had so politically the party finds itself against the proverbial wall and the direction it takes in my estimation will determine when or not it goes the way of the whigs, or it actually becomes a party that competes for a governable majority were in the future and that ties back to what mickey has written in his book, and i think his book really reflects the attitude of voters out, this idea can you as an elected official be more like us where i am sitting on the political process side, the party organization and structure, the challenge is to cr
in u.s. foreign policy. israel launched at least two air strikes against syria in just the past three days. officials say it's an effort to prevent weapons from falling into the hands of hezbollah. this morning israel is readying its iron dome missile defense shield after promises of retaliation by syrian forces. >>> meanwhile, there's a new u.n. report saying anti-government activists may have been behind the reported use of chemical weapons and not the regime. president obama said previously the use of such weapons could constitute a red line for u.s. intervention. senator john mccain used those words to undercut him sunday. >> the whole situation is becoming more and more expansive and unfortunately the red line that the president of the united states was written was written in disappearing ink. >> those comments comes days after chuck hagel refused to speculate on military intervention plans and john kerry heads to moscow today for talks with russian leaders. nbc's martin fletcher is in tel aviv for us. good morning to you, martin. some saying this attack could even be a message t
foreign policy. that cause is vital, not only for the united states, but for the world. i am delighted to see so many current and future leaders. president obama has recently embarked on a second term. secretary of state kerry has already traveled to the middle east and europe and asia. c ofgiven the existence of telephones and other modern conveniences, this much flying around may seem odd, but it does reflect the complexity of the current moment and the urgency we all feel about finding solutions. the good news is that the president and his team began position than they did four years ago. i said then that every new formcan president inherits of an international emergency crisis, two wars, and the steepest decline in america's international standing since the anon. i think we have made steady progress. we have brought our combat against al qaeda, weakening and scattering its support structure and eliminating osama bin laden. with help from our nato allies, we ended 40 years of dictatorship in libya. the administration has used diplomacy to tighten multilateral sanctions against iran,
's a strong influence behind pakistan's foreign policies. that's one reason why the future of anti-terror operations depends on the next government's relationship with the army. >> thank you. and that was nhk world's mubarik. >>> pakistan is important for regional security it is the last of the international forces withdrawn next year. now tomorrow we'll look at the domestic challenges the country faces. i'm dhra dhirakaosal reporting from islamabad. >>> the world's biggest fleet of boeing 787 dreamliners will soon be back in regular service. managers at japan's al nippon airways say technical glitches that grounded the planes for months will be fixed and the aircraft will take off on june 1st. crews modified the battery systems and conducted test flights to make sure the dreamliners are also safe. managers say the planes will fly on five international routes and 12 in japan. airlines around the world grounded their 787s in january because of problems with the battery system. u.s. aviation authorities and japanese transport ministry said last month airlines could fly their 787s onc
our foreign policy, eric, is not just bad economics, it's suicidal. the role of government is to protect americans, it's not to promote oortunity or to appease the muslims. that's exactly what we're doing. hundreds of millions of dollars to the muslim brotherhood? it's ke we didn't learn our lessons from iran in 1979. why do we even have embassies and consulates in countries that are openly antagonistictowards the western a american ideals. you know what we should do for our enemies? we should bomb them and eliminate em. hen go home. >> we all know howhese guys work. wayne is right. this is the way it works in certain countries. they need to be bribed in order for to gather intel. >> look at good it's working. >> this is endemic of the entire administrationhat we consistently throw moneyat stuff and we get no bang for our buck. this happens here at home, this happens overseas. no one is thinking, ll, like a business. money is not working in certain countries. >> to your point, tracy, the iraq debacle was not this adminiration, but i will say this. again, yeah, it is workin
-independent, but we're moving towards self-sufficiency. it shows the linkages between what happens here in our foreign policy, what happen there's and our abilities to succeed here at home. >> i love it. i think it's a great story. let me get your take on what is going on in some of these hot spots. >> sure. >> in the world like syria, which seems to continue to disintegrate, like north korea, which seems to continue to have more threats against the americans. what is your take on these hot spots? >> well north korea, the real question is whether china is going to use the influence it has to keep the north koreans under control. over the last few weeks, we've seen a little bit of that. north koreans have been barking a lot, but we've not seen a real outbreak of violence. i think it's because the north koreans understand the next korean war will be the last, that the united states and the world are not going to live with this kind of a north korean threat. syria is more difficult. i would say there the united states needs to continue to get involved. but there also needs to be a ceiling on what it is w
that brought in a whole into you narrative about foreign policy and dealing with terrorism and the consequences that led to four deaths of people who serve the united states. >> chris: do you think the talking points were politically scrubbed? >> of course, the they were. are you kidding? we are in the circumference ofin' election. on the eve of an election everything becomes political. unfortunately, americans die and people who believe in america and put their lives on the line weren't provided with protoes and weren't provided with a response. they and their families had to right to make sure they were defend the. we went into benghazi under the assumption somehow there was going to be a massacre in benghazi so we went there to libyan people.ronian people we couldn't go in to protect our own people? i'm offended by this and there ha has to be real answers to the questions raised. >> chris: let's assume that congressman kucinich is right and the talking points were scrubbed to protect hillary clinton and barack obama running for reelection? is that where the scandal ends? there were misjudgm
york preview book as well as my colleague who contributes to foreign policy magazine with the editor-in-chief and i think you've done something unusual with this book which is you've managed to do the impossible linking together margaret thatcher and the ayatollah khomeini, characters and a unified character of the great counter revolutionary year of 1979 and it is very provocative pieces that this was a year in which basically the backlash over the turn of the markets and religion with politics in a big way setolleion towards the reactions of the earlier postwar. how do we come up with about? who could possibly write a book that says margaret thatcher, the ayatollah khomeini, the afghan communist and the iranian revolutionary pope john paul ii and the factor of the polish martial which is a fascinating part of the book. how did you come up with putting these things together? >> guest: it had a lot to do with my reporting in afghanistan after 9/11. you were there, too. if my memory serves me and we stayed in the same house for a while with "newsweek" and then the house kind of struck
talks about the situation in syria and president obama's foreign policy agenda. >> my pleasure to welcome former secretary of state madeleine albright. she is excited to take our questions from our members and unlike what it might say in your program, her remarks are on the record. so please tweet away all of your little vip and staff and member cards. i will say your twitter handle. we're all about the social media right now. so tweet. as you all know secretary albright has been a beacon of american leadership and values around the world. both as secretary of state and as ambassador to the united nations. beyond that though she serves for many of us as a role model. she is sort of a north star for strong, principled national security policy. she reminds us that america is the indispensable nation, not the only nation that makes a difference but the one required to bring most of the other nations together. and she is a strong woman who worked in foreign policy. the first secretary of state to be a many would, something many of us can forget now, there are so many in her shadows
of the chinese delegation and he said it's just an instrumentity of american foreign policy. we had gone from neglecting asia to co-on thing the whole system. those are the kinds of things that anti-piracy and proliferation security initiative are certainly ways that south korea can take a lead and can play a collaborative role with it neighbors and hopefully china will get on board. china is one of the few countries that hasn't decwroined psi. probably because taiwan is anytime and they don't want to be a part of that. those are areas there could with b cooperation and i'm sure president park wants to bring china into those if at all possible. >> would you please go over to the podium please? >> i have two questions. microphone on please. >> just yesterday i came upon this very interesting article. i forgot the name of the author but he reviewed this book by victor char who serve on the administration in an important capacity. and what was said today i'm having on the other side that article in mind and these two questions going back and forth. one is as you pointed out is that the pattern o
. but sometimes they miss nato's du discussion, we have to recall that in foreign policy, the e.u. plays a phenomenal role in terms of it not voluntary assistance. nonmilitary preventative assistance is provided to a large proportion by the european union. 60% of foreign aid comes to the european union. when we talk about burden sharing, if we talk about being fair, we have to take those numbers into account. i do hope that this cooperation will flourish and i hope the europeans will take the military response abilities more seriously. thank you further explanation than remarks, which will help us continue with our work ahead of the summit. thank you again for coming to join us. [inaudible conversations] this first portion of the event includes an analysis of public opinion on drones and remarks from republican paul gosar to control the u.s.-mexico border and fight forest fires. >> good morning. thank you for joining us. my name is andres martinez coming to write with the new america foundation and one of the coordinators of our exciting future tense partnership, a partnership between ne
: it depends what you are looking for. i read stuff about foreign policy that is enough for everyone's taste. >> host: in just a little while we will show the books that influenced you and maybe you could take a look at that list and go from there for that caller. here is a tweak finally a woman after my own heart and mind it too bad her web site only shows about 1/8 of the content. >> guest: which web site? >> host: i am not sure i have been on nominee phil lipstick, the whole flock is there. >> guest: there is a problem on my personal web site with the archives have been subjected to a technical glitch in there is great difficulty to access it which i do apologize but of "the daily mail" columns are there. they can access the recent columns of got a problem but i think that is probably what this person is referring to. several years back there is a problem to access the archived material. >> host: how much of the electronic book will be published? >> guest: there are bits of books but it is different templates for different books. i don't want to do about those aside -- excitements but so
foreign policy credibility would be harmed, to which every sane person in the united states and around the world is saying what credibility? >> from the standpoint iraqi people, my belief is we will be greeted as libber ators. >> and ballistic missiles threaten the peace and security of many nations. >> we don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud. >> richard wolff, there's our credibility. the previous administration did everything it possibly could to eliminate any notion of worldwide credibility for american foreign policy predictions or pronouncements. >> lawrence, i think you're being unfair. they did say there were red lines over iraq, and saddam hussein, being saddam hussein, crossed them. you can't doubt their sincerity of desire to go to war. the weapons of mass destruction were overstated. they did in fact invade iraq. >> yeah, they were incapable of changing course in their predetermined desires of what to do, no matter what kind of information came their way, there wasn't any kind of intelligence that could derail them from where they were going in iraq. >> which is
on the president's plate when it comes to foreign policy. three weeks ago this was a crisis. that was being dealt with on an almost 24-hour basis. trying to figure out a way to deescalate the tensions between the north and the south. and all of a sudden, one terrorist attack later and you see the north koreans almost were looking for a way to deescalate themselves. they weren't sure clearly calling the bluff worked. in some form or another. so the question is, what more have we learned about what the policy is in dealing with them going forward. you're right, the two bigger questions, possibly loom large in here depending on where the questioning goes. one is, what is our syria policy right now, right? has it changed? we've heard the president say certain things would be a game-changer. certain things would cross a red line. i think there needs to be, there's some fundamental sort of let's get back to the basics here. what is exactly our policy right now on syria. and then you're right, on the benghazi, with the testimony happening tomorrow, i imagine there are more questions that come out of it
is obama's foreign policy. intervene but then don't do anything. lead from behind so passivity that led to the attack on 9/11. then the president's absence the whole night of the crisis. then they evade responsibility and deceive the american people and that pattern is not limited to that one instance in benghazi. >> congressman kucinich, i think it's fair to say you're a liberal democrat. does it bother you that the cia, as we now know, originally wrote about links to al qaeda, originally wrote about having warned the state department for months about threats in benghazi and that all of that was taken out and let's put this up on the screen. state department official victoria nuland wrote in pushing back against what the cia had had had written that information could be abused by members of congress to beat up the state department for not paying attention to 0 warnings so why woo woe want to feed that either? concern, this this, congressman, from the transparent administration of barack obama. >> well, i didn't need those memb memos to know that it was wrong for us to intervene in liby
contributes to foreign policy magazine where i'm the editor in chief, and i think you've done something very unusual with this book. you have managed to do in a way the impossible, linking together in one place margaret thatcher and the ayatollah, and the great counterrevolutionary year of 1979, and very provocative but this was a year that -- in which basically the backlash or the return of markets and religion to global politics in a big way, signaled a counterrevolution towards the reactions of the earlier postwar era. how did you come up with that? who could write a book that says, margaret thatcher, the communists, and the ayatollah, and the onan revolution north carolina have a common, never mind pope john paul ii and the resurgence of religion in a factor of polish. how did you come up with putting these things together? >> guest: had to thereto do with my reporting in afghanistan after 9/11. you were there, too. we actually stayed in the same house for a while. you were with washington post, i was with news week, and the house struck me at the time and had this shag carpeting and the
for him but he could have given a grand strategic vision for foreign policy, domestic policy, and instead he thinks wholly incapable of giving a speech that it not all about him and a speech that is not attacking attacking and knocking his opponents he gave a very prickly speech, why me, about those who omose me and my vision of big government then, you shouldn't listen to them. rather than say, listen, america is all about very robust debate. we're about the free market place and the train wreck of idea. he doesn't do that. he never does that. so, this kind of speech actually was more like an indoctrination speech because he is talking to young kids. a commencement speech should be about their future. >> neil: it wasn't. i want you to respond. this touch on something you were talking about. >> unfortunately, you've grown up hearing voices that incessantly warn of government as nothing more than some separate sinister entity that is at the root of all our problems. neil knoll what do you think of that? >> i was being somewhat sarcastic, as i told you election night you said, he'll unify a
of foreign policy. yourself, when is the last time you saw a stage full of latinos talking about foreign policy. let's talk about it for a second. is headed to venezuela in a few days and we all know the passing of hugo chavez, there is great conversation and consideration, concern really, about what happens in the region. there is a broader conversation about u.s. policy in latin america, in central america. there's a lot we could talk about. since we're talking about it, what are you going to venezuela for? the will be part of observation process, invited by the national electoral council for the elections in venezuela one week from tomorrow. i will be visiting polling places and so forth. my organization has a 20-year- old developer program that exposes and latino leaders to other countries. we have done a lot of work in mexico, central american, the caribbean, venezuela, observing elections, providing technical assistance, and so forth. you're right. it's a very crucial moment. although a hugo chavez was demonized in the united states, in latin america, there's quite a different pers
at johns hopkins and the book "the dispensable nation: american foreign policy in retreat," which i have here, an iranian-american, political comem tear #* at a -- common at a timer, briefed congress, and many people, of he was born in 1960, and his family came to the united states having left iran after the revolution. he has a bachelor's, a master's degree from the fletcher school of law and diplomacy and urned a ph.d. in political science from mitt. well done. i won't go through the long lists of accomplishments, they are special, but i especially draw attention, a great part of the book, which is the time you spent working under richard holbrooke, 2009-2011, as part of the special office, special adviser on pakistan and afghanistan. now, special adviser to the secretary of state. there always are other offices one discovers that do the same thing you do, and that's part of the problem as you lay out in the book which is fascinating. other works that you've done, sheer revival, i used in courses i've done, how conflicts in islam shape the future, forces of forchip, the rise of the new
, everyone. i'm betty nguyen. a major movement over the weekend could prompt a decisive shift in u.s. foreign policy. israel launched at least two airstrikes against syria in just the past three days. it is an effort to prevent weapons from falling into the hands of his bow la. this morning israel is readying its iron dome missile defense shield after promises of retaliation by syrian forces. meanwhile, a new u.s. report says antigovernment activists may have been behind the recent reported use of chemical weapons and not the regime. president obama said the use of weapons would prompt a red line for weapons. now senator john mccain used those words to undercut him on sunday. >> as the whole situation is becoming more and more expansive and unfortunately the red line that the president of the united states wrote was apparently written in disappearing ink. >> those comments come days after defense secretary chuck hagel refused to speculate on any intervention plans. and secretary of state john kerry heads to moscow today for a talk with russian leaders. jim is in london for us this mornings. g
to learn u.s. foreign policy and military secrets. it is accusing china of cyber spying. >>> the walt disney company is developing new star wars video game. disney said they will produce games for core gamers. they will focus on new games for casual audiences on might, social and online -- mobile, social and online platforms. this comes one month after they said they would close the game studio. >>> back to our weather now. we are tracking some rain and thundershowers. potential thundershowers. >> getting reports of thunder and lightning. especially in antioch. the hardest hit today. rain is coming down heavy at times. the thing i will let you know, though is, the direction was moving this way. moving this way. 7 miles per hour. now it is getting motion going this way. it is standing still. this was dropping lightning strikes and thunder about 35 minutes ago. it is dying out. this system looks like it is petering out. if you are by brentwood, antioch, pittsburg the rain is coming down heavy at times and reports of thunder and lightning. these area, potential lightning strikes, you see
.s. foreign policy and the long list includes the white house, the defense department, the fbi and chase bank. we learned the attack could be underway and microsoft could have been hacked already. meantime, chinese government is denying accusations that they are carrying out cyber attacks. some of the reason attacks on u.s. computer systems are tied to the chinese military operating out of big cities. they strongly deny it and say u.s. should work with china on fighting crime. >>> as our kyla campbell talks, she explains it is both countries. >> reporter: they are fed up with joint navy drills between u.s. and south korea. north korea is threatening both countries saying if any shells under up on their land, it comes as the count trip moved its miss sells away -- missiles away from launch pads. after kim jong il threatened for weeks to launch those miss sells. they are using today's talks at the white house to mark the of -- 60th anniversary of the country's alliance and north korea under its new young leader and also on the agenda, president barack obama and park are talking trade and econom
was riveting. it has made hillary clinton be a liar. it shows that obama has no foreign policy, and they tried to find -- they mentioned chick fillet. physical -- chick-fil-a. if you have never had chick-fil-a, i mean, it is the food of the gods. >> demographics are for those who use the hash tag bill schulz. they share a couple things in common, they live in alleys and collect twine. >> that is a terrible thing to say about the head of the amtrak pr, bill schulz. i happened to get the twitter name first. i apologize, sir. that was scurlous. >> you don't even know what scurlous means. >> it is the same as besmirch. >>> from benghazi to been purring. they tried to turn housecats into. spies. popular science magazine shows operation uh could acoustic kitty aimed to turn a fur ball into a feline by, quote, implanting a microphone in her ear and small radio trans mater. transmitter and weaving the antenna into her white fur. the cats are not interested in ease see yen thonl. the cat was tasked with capturing the on the conversation of two men. but it got board and went into the street and was run
. but sometimes in this nato/e.u. discussion we have to recall that in foreign policy, the e.u. plays a phenomenal role in terms of its nonmilitary assistance. nonmilitary preventive assistance is provided for -- to a large proportion by the european union. 60% of foreign aid comes from the european union so if we want to talk about burden-sharing and being fair, we want to take those numbers into account. i do hope that this cooperation will flourish, and i too hope the europeans will take their military responsibilities more seriously. thank you very much for your explanations and remarks, which will help us to continue with our work ahead of the summit. thank you again for coming to join us. >> opposing slavery, she influences her husband to switch from the whig party to the republican party, and she hope hosts the first annual white house easter egg role. as we continue our series on fir ladies with your questions and comments by phone, facebook, and twitter, monday night. and also on c-span radio and c-span.org. >> you're watching c-span2, with politics and public affairs weekdays featuring l
about foreign policy which perhaps is not for everyone, to work out what on earth is going on. >> host: we will show your favorite books, the books that influenced you. maybe take a look at that list and go from there for that color. mrs. ct tweets a woman after my own heart and mind. too better web site is only showing about one eighth of the content. >> guest: which website? >> host: not sure which website she is referring to. i have been on melanie phillips.com, your columns. >> guest: my personal web site melanie phillips.com, my archives have been subjected to terrible technical glitch. there is great difficulty accessing it for which i do apologize. >> host: your recent daily mail column. >> guest: people can access the recent columns without a problem. that is probably what this person is referring to. if you go back into the archives, several years back there is a problem accessing the archive material. >> host: how much electronic book will be published? the first chapter? the forward? >> guest: there are bits of it, bits of the books but not -- different templates from differ
work for president obama, but they work at the nfc on foreign policy issues directly related to benghazi. let's call a spade a spade. let's also show you why cnn did not go very far in covering these hearings because the cnn deputy bureau chief, virginia moseley, is married to hillary clinton's deputy, tom nize. it is time for the media to start asking questions why are they not covering this. it's a family matter for some of them. >> they don't want to bring embarrassment upon folks who -- who they're close to. >> who directly are related to this story. absolutely. they're covering for them. there's no question about it. >> it's actually worse than that if it's possible. that is, cheryl at kerr son of cbs has been a hero of the story. she's had her own string of scoops the last eight month. and she had a nice write up in the "post" which i'll give them credit for, the mead brazil responded with cbs management is suspicious. they think she's become an advocate. it's a strange world where your own network reporter is getting scoops and getting ratings. and your managers who ar
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